Giving to Yale

Yale Formally Dedicates the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design

On Thursday, February 14, 2013, Yale University formally dedicated the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID). Joined by over 200 students, faculty, staff, and donors, President-elect Peter Salovey hailed the center as an inspiring addition to the Yale campus. Salovey noted the “buzz” of excitement that the center has already created, citing the nearly 700 members from across the University who have joined since the CEID’s informal opening in the fall of 2012.

CEID Ribbon Cutting

The 8,500-square-foot CEID occupies the completely renovated ground floor of the Becton Center on Prospect Street. Equipped with an expansive, light-filled studio of modular workstations, a machine shop, a wood shop, and a wet lab, as well as lecture and meeting rooms and a café, the CEID is home to classes, workshops, and extracurricular projects. Its mission is to empower students to improve human lives through the advancement of technology.

In his remarks, Salovey praised the CEID’s embodiment of his vision to continue building “a more unified Yale, a more accessible Yale, a more innovative Yale, and a more excellent Yale.” He applauded the work of T. Kyle Vanderlick, dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science, particularly her role in re-invigorating the culture of engineering at Yale and bridging the humanities and sciences.

Salovey praised the CEID’s embodiment of his vision to continue building “a more unified Yale, a more accessible Yale, a more innovative Yale, and a more excellent Yale.”

The ceremonies opened with a keynote address by James McNerney ’71, CEO of the Boeing Company, who celebrated the center’s ability to draw strength from many disciplines and discussed the role of collaborative innovation in business. McNerny called innovation “the most important and sustainable competitive advantage in business” and told the members of the CEID: “There is no substitute for the innovation you’re doing.”

CEID Director Eric R. Dufresne ’96 highlighted the intellectual diversity of the center, explaining that half of its Yale College members are majoring in something other than the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math). The CEID, Dufresne noted, compliments the collaborative art spaces of the residential colleges by offering a place where students can have a hands-on experience creating prototypes and material solutions to real-world problems.

After the formal remarks, student members of the CEID displayed various projects the center has helped develop, including an award-winning melanoma detection tool and a communication system to track the performance of remote mini-turbines in the developing world.